Knowledge

This section contains recommendations of books for LGBTIQ and gender and sexual diversity therapists and clients, and provides links to other suitable organisations.

If you are gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, intersex or any other gender or sexual preference and are seeking literature about the societal and personal issues surrounding sexuality and gender, or if you are a therapist who is working with clients such as this and looking for texts to gain a greater understanding, then start your search here.

Once you have found what you are looking for, we highly recommend that you check out Gay’s The Word, a friendly and well stocked bookshop in central London that should meet your requirements. If you do not live in London, consider supporting us by visiting our Amazon shop and purchasing books from there.

We are currently in the process of transferring all of our resources from our old site into these pages, and will continue to add books and material regularly, so this section will continue to grow and expand. Please do visit again if you cannot find what you are looking for just yet. We are also open to suggestions, so if you would like to recommend an appropriate book or link, feel free to contact us.

Queer Blues: the lesbian and gay guide to overcoming depression

Queer Blues: the lesbian and gay guide to overcoming depression Image

Kimeran Hardin PhD and Marny Hall PhD, Forward By Betty Berzon PhD. New Harbinger Publications, 2001

Key Elements: A clear and coherent exploration of how and why lesbians and gays experience depression, a well rounded approach to helping gays and lesbians deal with the particulars of depressions from a perspective that supports the diversity the of the gay and lesbian community.

Chapter 1. ‘Shades of Blue: What Depression Is and Isn’t’ there is an overview of depression, the symptoms of major depression, varieties of depression, an summary of the causes of depression, the role of the biological, psychological and environmental causes.

Chapter 2. ‘Blue Passages: How Society Contributes to Depression for Lesbians and Gays’, looks at the role that culture plays in depression, the passages that we have from one stage of life to another.

Chapter 3. ‘Blue Genes; Internal Contributions to Depression’ provides diagrams that explain the nervous system, the brain, the nerves and neurons, the neurotransmitters, norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, the hormone connection , genetics, links between the brain chemistry, hormones, and genetics.

Chapter 4. ‘Blue Portraits: Queer Stories’, there are different types of ‘Blues covered in chapter 4, they are, ‘The Winter Blues’. ‘Survivor Blues’. ‘Bipolar Disorder’, ‘Gender Blues’ and ‘Postpartum Blues’.

Chapter 5. ‘Tips for Main Squeezes: How to Cope With A Depressed Partner’, information about the myths you may have heard (about depression), the informal signs of your partner’s depression, it also provides information on what to do if your partner is suicidal.

Chapter 6 .’Monitoring The Minotaur: Self – Management and Self-Nurturing’, here the relationship between cognition, beliefs and behaviour, it also how to increase your awareness of negative thoughts.

Chapter 7. ‘Queer Psychology Therapy: The Talking Cure-How to Choose a Therapist’ details are given about psychiatrists, psychologists, counsellors and other practical issues related to therapy, along with summaries of different theoretical approaches.

Chapter 8. ‘Medications and Other Biological Treatments: Queer Psychiatrists Speak Out’, sums up the medications for managing depression, Heterocyclic (commonly prescribed antidepressants), Selective Serotonin Reuptake (SSRI), Monoamine Oxidase (MAOIs), other novel and atypical antidepressants, there are also conversations with authorities.

Chapter 9. ‘Befriending The Black Dog: Putting It All Together’, gives views of the holistic views of the blues, the politics of identity, profiles in courage, and ‘leaving the queer blues’.

Queer Blues: the lesbian and gay guide to overcoming depression

Queer Blues: the lesbian and gay guide to overcoming depression Image

Kimeran Hardin PhD and Marny Hall PhD, Forward By Betty Berzon PhD. New Harbinger Publications, 2001

Key Elements: A clear and coherent exploration of how and why lesbians and gays experience depression, a well rounded approach to helping gays and lesbians deal with the particulars of depressions from a perspective that supports the diversity the of the gay and lesbian community.

Chapter 1. ‘Shades of Blue: What Depression Is and Isn’t’ there is an overview of depression, the symptoms of major depression, varieties of depression, an summary of the causes of depression, the role of the biological, psychological and environmental causes.

Chapter 2. ‘Blue Passages: How Society Contributes to Depression for Lesbians and Gays’, looks at the role that culture plays in depression, the passages that we have from one stage of life to another.

Chapter 3. ‘Blue Genes; Internal Contributions to Depression’ provides diagrams that explain the nervous system, the brain, the nerves and neurons, the neurotransmitters, norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, the hormone connection , genetics, links between the brain chemistry, hormones, and genetics.

Chapter 4. ‘Blue Portraits: Queer Stories’, there are different types of ‘Blues covered in chapter 4, they are, ‘The Winter Blues’. ‘Survivor Blues’. ‘Bipolar Disorder’, ‘Gender Blues’ and ‘Postpartum Blues’.

Chapter 5. ‘Tips for Main Squeezes: How to Cope With A Depressed Partner’, information about the myths you may have heard (about depression), the informal signs of your partner’s depression, it also provides information on what to do if your partner is suicidal.

Chapter 6 .’Monitoring The Minotaur: Self – Management and Self-Nurturing’, here the relationship between cognition, beliefs and behaviour, it also how to increase your awareness of negative thoughts.

Chapter 7. ‘Queer Psychology Therapy: The Talking Cure-How to Choose a Therapist’ details are given about psychiatrists, psychologists, counsellors and other practical issues related to therapy, along with summaries of different theoretical approaches.

Chapter 8. ‘Medications and Other Biological Treatments: Queer Psychiatrists Speak Out’, sums up the medications for managing depression, Heterocyclic (commonly prescribed antidepressants), Selective Serotonin Reuptake (SSRI), Monoamine Oxidase (MAOIs), other novel and atypical antidepressants, there are also conversations with authorities.

Chapter 9. ‘Befriending The Black Dog: Putting It All Together’, gives views of the holistic views of the blues, the politics of identity, profiles in courage, and ‘leaving the queer blues’.

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